Tag Archives: science

“Uncertainty”: A Science Art Exhibit in Pasadena, CA

Since moving to the Los Angeles area, I’ve been constantly overwhelmed with how much stuff there is to do, and am regularly torn between coinciding events. However, one event I knew I could not miss was the opening of the Uncertainty art exhibit at the Williamson Gallery of the Pasadena ArtCenter College of Design. Exhibit description: UNCERTAINTY is the

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“Grain Philosophy of Science” by Roald Hoffmann

  I have a special treat for readers today! I have mentioned before that one of my greatest role models is Dr. Roald Hoffmann (below), the Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters, Emeritus at Cornell University. He was awarded the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for helping develop the Woodward–Hoffmann rules, which contributed greatly to our understanding of

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Protein Structure and Folding Captured in Sculpture

What happens when an artist is formally trained in quantum mechanics? Julian Voss-Andreae. Julian Voss-Andreae is an artist from Germany who now lives and works in Portland, Oregon. He received an undergraduate degree in physics and graduate training in quantum mechanics. In the above sculpture, Julian featured the hemoglobin protein: the molecule that carries oxygen from

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Protein Portraits: An art class for science nerds

Wouldn’t it be cool if there were such thing as a hybrid science-art class? At Oregon State University, there is! It’s an undergraduate honors course called Protein Portraits, taught by Phil McFadden and described by the same as: The Oregon State University Honors College course that adds paint brushes and plaster of Paris to the toolkit

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Poems on demand by the Typewriter Troubadour

Last weekend, a street poet in Bend, Oregon wrote a $4 poem about science. While walking around downtown and waiting for a table to open up at Deschutes Brewery on my badly needed vacation, I passed by a guy with a typewriter and a sign saying, “Custom Poems–Your Subject, Your Price.” The present customer, a woman with two young daughters, was

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Scientific art installations at the Linus Pauling Institute

The Linus Pauling Institute (LPI, originally the “Institute of Orthomolecular Medicine”) was founded by Linus Pauling and his colleagues in 1973; its research was focused on characterizing the role of vitamins and other micronutrients in promoting human health, and on understanding how their deficiencies could lead to chronic diseases. In 1996, the Institute was relocated to Oregon State University’s

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Repurposing science jargon for literary prose

Although the English language has an indisputably rich vocabulary, I still sometimes find myself wishing it were bigger. Who hasn’t envied German’s “Waldeinsamkeit,” Japanese’s “Komorebi,” Georgian’s “Shemomedjamo,” or Russian’s “Toska”? (For definitions, see bottom of page.) But often, when I feel I’m at a loss for words, I recall certain terms in science that don’t have

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